Tuesday, September 6, 2011

Teens Dropping out of School: Tips to Prevent High School Dropouts

Parenting teenagers can be a challenge.

Generations prior finishing high school was never an option.

Today more teens are opting to drop-out completely or get their GED.  Why?

A mother, who asked to have her name withheld, with a student at Cypress Bay High School in Weston, recently said, "My son doesn't think he has to finish school.  He said he can just get a GED like some other kids did.  His father and I are completely beside ourselves.  We fear he will drop-out, it seems kids today don't understand the importance of an education."

Why do students drop-out?

There’s no single reason.

Students drop out of school for a number of different reasons—and it’s typically a combination of many issues. Here are some of the top reasons students give for leaving school:

  • Classes aren’t interesting
  • Parents/family/adults have low expectations
  • Poor attendance
  • Failing in school
  • Family responsibilities (work, caring for siblings, etc.)
  • Becoming a parent
  • Too much freedom
What are some warning signs to look for?
What to watch for. There are specific factors to watch for in students who are likely to drop out of school. If you see one or more of these signs, get involved! You can give these students the Boost they need to stay in school.
  • They don’t feel challenged in school.
  • They don’t feel high educational expectations from either their family or school.
  • They believe their parents are too controlling and they want to rebel.
  • They have trouble with schoolwork or feel like they are not as smart as other students.
  • They have drug, alcohol or mental health problems.
  • They regularly miss school or are frequently tardy.
  • They struggle with problems at home, including physical or verbal abuse.
  • They feel like they don’t fit in or have friends at school.
  • Their peers or siblings have dropped out of school.
  • They have poor learning conditions at school—such as overcrowding, high levels of violence and excessive absenteeism.
If you fear your teen is heading down a negative path and you need to get them back on track, visit www.BoostUp.org or www.HelpYourTeens.com for more information.

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