Wednesday, October 26, 2011

Text Talk - What is your teen really saying?

Whether it is texting, instant messaging, or social networking – do you really know what your teenager is saying?  They seem to have their own language and codes for things parents may not approve of.
One of my favorite new sites is Enough is Enough! And how many times as parents do we say this?

Do you feel overwhelmed about protecting children from the dangers of the virtual world?

Who doesn’t?

When it comes to teens it can be more difficult and even more important to be a parent in the know.

Let’s start with 50 Acronyms Parents Should Know:
(Courtesy of Enough is Enough and NetLingo)
  1. 8 - Oral sex
  2. 1337 - Elite -or- leet -or- L337
  3. 143 - I love you
  4. 182 - I hate you
  5. 1174 - Nude club
  6. 420 - Marijuana
  7. 459 - I love you
  8. ADR - Address
  9. AEAP - As Early As Possible
  10. ALAP - As Late As Possible
  11. ASL - Age/Sex/Location
  12. CD9 - Code 9 – it means parents are around
  13. C-P - Sleepy
  14. F2F - Face-to-Face
  15. GNOC - Get Naked On Cam
  16. GYPO - Get Your Pants Off
  17. HAK - Hugs And Kisses
  18. ILU - I Love You
  19. IWSN - I Want Sex Now
  20. J/O - Jerking Off
  21. KOTL - Kiss On The Lips
  22. KFY -or- K4Y - Kiss For You
  23. KPC - Keeping Parents Clueless
  24. LMIRL - Let’s Meet In Real Life
  25. MOOS - Member Of The Opposite Sex
  26. MOSS - Member(s) Of The Same Sex
  27. MorF - Male or Female
  28. MOS - Mom Over Shoulder
  29. MPFB - My Personal F*** Buddy
  30. NALOPKT - Not A Lot Of People Know That
  31. NIFOC - Nude In Front Of The computer
  32. NMU - Not Much, You?
  33. P911 - Parent Alert
  34. PAL - Parents Are Listening
  35. PAW - Parents Are Watching
  36. PIR - Parent In Room
  37. POS - Parent Over Shoulder -or- Piece Of Sh**
  38. pron - porn
  39. Q2C - Quick To Cum
  40. RU/18 - Are You Over 18?
  41. RUMORF - Are You Male OR Female?
  42. RUH - Are You Horny?
  43. S2R - Send To Receive
  44. SorG - Straight or Gay
  45. TDTM - Talk Dirty To Me
  46. WTF - What The F***
  47. WUF - Where You From
  48. WYCM - Will You Call Me?
  49. WYRN - What’s Your Real Name?
  50. zerg - To gang up on someone
Be an educated parent – you will have safer teens!

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Wednesday, October 19, 2011

Teen Help for Struggling Teens

Are you wondering what happened to once happy-go-lucky, kind, polite and studious child went?

Teens can be a challenge – especially in today’s ever changing world with technology and a society that is making our kids grow up so much faster.

Common parent statements:

“My teen is so smart! His/her IQ is superior, but they are not working up to their potential.”
“My teen is so beautiful/handsome – good looking – even has many friends.” (Of course, the peer group has changed and you don’t know why.)
“My teen is very athletic! He/she made the varsity team at a young age, has won all sorts of awards, but now has dropped out and has zero interest in this sport.”

How to be a perfect parent?

There is no such thing as a perfect parent, however there is such a thing as being an educated parent.  This is not about book smarts or academics, it is about first hand experiences from parents that have been where you are.

Becoming an educated parent in the teen help industry is possible with Parent’s Universal Resource Experts.

Blame Game and Parent Denial
  • Not my kid, it is the kids he/she is hanging with.
  • My child was caught with pot, but he swears it was his friend’s.
  • It’s the schools fault.
  • If I only had sent him to another school.
  • If I only had given into the cell phone.
  • His grandparents spoil him rotten.
  • When is it appropriate to read your teen’s journal, text messages, emails, social networking sites etc?
  • When safety triumphs privacy!  Is your teen withdrawn, secretive, changing friends?
  • Be a parent first, friendship is built on that foundation.
Common mistakes parents make:

Major misconception of parents:  Almost all parents that contact us have that next Einstein or Dan Marino, but the fact they are either changing friends, smoking pot, not attending classes or school at all, wanting to drop out of school all together and just get a GED, are all signs you are heading down a very negative path. This road usually escalates before it gets better.

Get help today – contact

Friday, October 14, 2011

PEERx: Who is your teen hanging with?

What path will your teen choose?

National Drug Facts Week is Monday, October 31st through Sunday, November 6th, 2011.

Sponsored by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), National Drug Facts Week is an annual official health observance designed to shatter the myths and spread the facts about drug abuse and addiction.

National Drug Facts Week (NDFW) is a health observance week for teens that aims to shatter the myths about drugs and drug abuse. Through community-‐based events and activities on the Web, on TV, and through contests, NIDA is working to encourage teens to get factual answers from scientific experts about drugs and drug abuse. Download the NDFW Info Sheet!

PeerX: RX abuse is drug abuse.

Over and over again parents will say that it isn't their kid, it is the peer group they are hanging with.


Isn't it your teen making the choice to be with them?

Until parents move out of denial, it is almost impossible to get your teen help.  Not only is it the teen that has to admit they have a problem, the parents have to face the fact that their child is making some very poor choices.  As with many parents, they are afraid of the stigma - afraid of what family or friends will think, but what about your teens future?  Doesn't that take priority?

Are you ignoring teen drug use signs?
Check out 10 quick tips to help prevent teen drug use: Click here.

Do you have a teen that you suspect is using drugs? Have you exhausted all your local resources? Take the time to learn about residential therapy, visit Each teen and family are unique, there are many teen help programs, knowing how to locate the one best for you can be a challenge, however Parents’ Universal Resource Experts  can help, starting with a free consultation.

Join us on Facebook and learn more about today's teens!  Follow us on Twitter!

Be an educated parent, you will have healthier teens.

Saturday, October 8, 2011

Health Benefits of Video Games with Teens

Since home video games were popularized in the '80s, killjoys have blamed them for almost every ill in society. Games have supposedly started wars, made children morbidly obese and caused people to shun the outside world, at least according to their theories. In reality, video games are an entertaining, sometimes time-consuming hobby that falls somewhere between watching TV and reading books.

Believe it or not, there is some good associated with parking yourself in front your favorite console each day. Perhaps you've experienced some of the following health benefits — and, even if you haven't, you can show them to your significant other to convince her/him that you haven't really been wasting massive amounts of time.
  1. They comfort people with depression As with any mind-consuming activity that you thoroughly enjoy, gaming can serve as somewhat of an antidepressant. In the case of Bejeweled, a puzzle game in which players move gems into rows based on their colors, a study indicated that participants experience improved mood and heart rhythm from a session of play. Essentially, it helps people unwind and relax as if they're working on a crossword puzzle — something that certainly isn't viewed as an unhealthy activity.
  2. They improve dexterity A study conducted by psychologists at the University of Rochester found that video game-playing surgical residents and surgeons who were tasked with performing a procedure were 24% faster, made 32% fewer errors and scored 26% better overall. Those percentages were even higher for those who played game in the past for more than three hours. The findings could open the door to training potential surgeons and scientists from an early age. Having surgery soon? You'll be better off if your surgeon is a gamer — imagine that.
  3. They improve your eyesight Forget LASIK eye surgery — you can spend $60 on a video game and experience improvement in your vision. According to researchers at the University of Rochester, people who played action video games for a month were able to identify letters presented in clutter 20% better than before. Incredibly, results were shown after just 30 hours of play. When you play action games, your vision is tested to its limit, and the brain adjusts accordingly. The human body is pretty neat.
  4. They improve social skills Gamers have been unfairly stereotyped through the years as socially inept, significant-other-less freaks who dwell in their parents' basements. The fact of the matter, given the sheer popularity of gaming, is that a variety of individuals with varying personalities compose the gaming community. As it turns out, World of Warcraft, a game that requires players to be social, teaches leadership and conflict resolution skills, according to a Swedish researcher. Although fans of the game may be viewed as cult-like, they're actually strengthening their ability to function in the outside world.
  5. They improve knowledge retention  Video games can be used for the specific purpose of advancing learning. A study conducted at the University of Kansas found they can impart specific knowledge. Researchers administered tests to three different groups, one of which prepared using a PowerPoint lecture and two of which prepared using a video game. Of course, the latter two groups demonstrated better knowledge retention. The advantage of using video games in this case may have been the mere fact that it requires active engagement of the mind, as opposed to almost thoughtlessly looking over slides.
  6.  They increase response time Amazing work is being done at the University of Rochester. In another much-welcomed study, researchers found that video games can provide a training regimen that increases visual reaction times while maintaining accuracy. Certain games require quick processing of sensory information, an activity that can be mastered with practice. If you're a fan of Halo or Call of Duty, take note — those skills could prove useful in other nonviolent endeavors.
  7. They reduce stress Not only do video games serve as a distraction, but they can fight anger. Researchers at Texas A&M University found that playing violent video games, such as Call of Duty 2, gave players an outlet in which to take out their aggression, contradicting the numerous studies that have indicated the opposite. Thinking of going postal? Play Playstation instead.
  8. They improve self esteem It always feels good to crush your opponent in Madden, which naturally makes you feel better about yourself. But did you know there have been games designed for the specific purpose of improving your self esteem? McGill University researchers focused on encouraging positive thoughts and positive attitudes in an effort to remove negative thought patterns. Of course, developing self-esteem is a bit more complex than just playing a video game, but it provides a good start for patterning behavior.
  9. They actually help you exercise and lose weight One of the most obvious health benefits of modern gaming is physical, thanks to the creation of Wii and its exergaming offerings. The International Sports Sciences Association confirmed that such games are effective at getting kids off the couch and increasing their heart rates, a far cry from the stereotype that all gamers are obese oafs. Seniors seeking gentler exercise can play Wii fit, for example, to maintain their health, which is why many senior residences contain the gaming system.
  10. They relieve pain Perhaps pain really is all in the mind. Once again, the key word is "distraction" here, as participating in games can take a player's mind off of their ailment, according to researchers at Emory University. It's most effective using virtual reality, which can transport a player into an entirely different virtual world. This type of therapy has been used with real patients, including those who've endured significant trauma. What's more, there are no side effects — beats the heck out of a lot of medications.
Source:  Best Online Colleges

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Saturday, October 1, 2011

Parent Teacher Conference Tips

It was only a short time ago parents were scrambling to get school supplies and their kids ready for a new school year.

Now the time is nearing for parents.

Parent teacher conferences are usually set for October.  

Are you ready?

Here are some tips to help you get the most from your time with your child's teachers.

Before the conference:
  • Check grades and teacher expectations. Many schools post student’s grades on their Student Information System. So review your child’s past work. There’s no reason to get caught off guard.
  • Jot questions and prioritize concerns. Take a few minutes to jot down questions for the teacher. Take those with you so you won’t forget to ask. Also, don’t forget to ask your kid if there is anything the teacher might tell you that you don’t know. (It’s always best to not be surprised.)  
  • Meet your needs. If you need extra set of “ears” to be with you, you feel intimidated, or worry the teacher may use jargon you don’t understand, bring a friend (a neighbor, relative, older child). If you need a translator (language or sign), call the school to arrange one. Let the teacher know before the conference if you are in a contentious divorce or if your partner requests to come to the conference separately.
  • Block time. The teacher has scheduled only a set amount of time, so you will want to use every second wisely and not be distracted. Arrange a baby sitter for a younger child and allow ample time to get there.
Here are the four areas of learning to discuss during the conference:
  • Academic: Find out what your child’s strongest and weakest subjects are, how he compares to the other students and if he is keeping up with the workload. You might ask: “If you were to evaluate my child now, what would his grade and average test score be in each subject? "If the teacher uses educational terms that you’re not familiar with, ask for a simpler explanation. Ask to see specific examples of any academic problem so you know how to help or if a tutor might be helpful.
  • Social: Find out how your childgets along with others. Let the teacher know of any bullying or repeated peer rejection and create a safety plan. Ask for recommendations for a new friend if there are social problems.
  • Behavior: Find out how your child behaves around peers and adults and if he is showing up on time and prepared to learn. If there are behavior issues, get specifics: what the behavior looks like, the teacher’s discipline approach, any triggers or patterns (when and where the behavior usually happens), and how it is being resolved.
  • Emotional/health: Find out how your child is coping. Explain any home issues that could affect your child’s learning performance (a divorce, deployment, illness of a relative) and any serious allergies, sleep problems, medication, counseling or other health-related issues that the teacher should know about.
If your child is having any kind of problem in one or more of those four learning areas, then discuss strategies you and the teacher can do to help your child by creating common goals. Discuss how you will you know if things are improving or declining and if there's no improvement, ask what our “next step” will be and how the teacher would like to be contacted.

After your conference:

Go home, share what you learned with your child and parenting partner, and then commit to doing what you discussed. If you see that your child continues to struggle or you do not see improvement in a few weeks, or things get worse, call for another conference. If you still don’t get help, then it’s time to seek the help of the principal, vice-principal or counselor.

Special contributor: Michele Borba, Parenting Expert and author of The Big Book of Parenting Solutions.

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